PRIMARY STRUCTURE, REFERENCE – ALDO VAN EYCK SONSBEEK PAVILJOEN, A temporary pavilion was designed by Aldo Van Eyck and built in the summer of 1966 to host sculptures by nearly thirty artists (including Brancusi, Arp and Giacometti) in the Sonsbeek park in Arnhem. Destroyed a few months later, it was rebuilt in 2006 in the garden of the Kröller-Müller museum in Hoenderloo, Netherlands. The unspectacular construction is a careful exercise in plan drawing: six parallel walls almost 4m high are placed with a distance of 2.5m from each other. The way the walls bend forming semicircular spaces and the sudden cuts transform this simple pattern in a complex spatial device. Until its reconstruction, this work stood as a model of “paper architecture”, with a life of its own, “known and discussed on account of the theoretical concept it embodies, but no longer experienced as a real spatial structure” posted by Manon Coppens at 31.05.17, filed under: brick, STUDIO: studio17-1,
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PRIMARY STRUCTURE, REFERENCE – ALDO VAN EYCK SONSBEEK PAVILJOEN, A temporary pavilion was designed by Aldo Van Eyck and built in the summer of 1966 to host sculptures by nearly thirty artists (including Brancusi, Arp and Giacometti) in the Sonsbeek park in Arnhem. Destroyed a few months later, it was rebuilt in 2006 in the garden of the Kröller-Müller museum in Hoenderloo, Netherlands. The unspectacular construction is a careful exercise in plan drawing: six parallel walls almost 4m high are placed with a distance of 2.5m from each other. The way the walls bend forming semicircular spaces and the sudden cuts transform this simple pattern in a complex spatial device. Until its reconstruction, this work stood as a model of “paper architecture”, with a life of its own, “known and discussed on account of the theoretical concept it embodies, but no longer experienced as a real spatial structure” posted by Manon Coppens at 31.05.17, filed under: brick, STUDIO: studio17-1, back-button
fig 162A,
RESOURCES 1 SOCKS